Gun Trusts, ATF 41P update

Image result for atfFinally, at long last, we have some clarity on what and how the ATF will be regulating the use of "gun trusts" for purchase of National Firearms Act items.

On January 15, the final rules were published in the Federal Register, so we have 6 months to stay under the old rules until these become effective.

Why they changed things:

 "The goal of this final rule is to ensure that the identification and background check requirements apply equally to individuals, trusts, and legal entities. To lessen potential compliance burdens for the public and law enforcement, DOJ has revised the final rule to eliminate the requirement for a certification signed by a chief law enforcement officer (CLEO) and instead require CLEO notification. DOJ has also clarified that the term “responsible person” for a trust or legal entity includes those persons who have the power and authority to direct the management and policies of the trust or legal entity to receive, possess, ship, transport, deliver, transfer, or otherwise dispose of a firearm for, or on behalf of, the trust or entity. In the case of a trust, those with the power or authority to direct the management and policies of the trust include any person who has the capability to exercise such power and possesses, directly or indirectly, the power or authority under any trust instrument, or under State law, to receive, possess, ship, transport, deliver, transfer, or otherwise dispose of a firearm for or on behalf of the trust."

What this means: 

1. No more CLEO signoff. This means as an individual purchaser, (no trust) you don't need the sheriff (nor his deputy, if you're Bob Marley).  Additionally, they removed the proposed threat of having everyone on a trust having to get the CLEO sign off. Copies of applications just get sent to the CLEO. This is a good move.

2. Fingerprints, passport photos, background checks for all "responsible persons." If  (more) background checks help reduce crime and prevent weapons from getting into the hands of those who should not have them, I'm all for it. I still won't believe the justification for this (trusts and entities were allegedly "exempt" from the background check requirements) is that a trust was a free pass for bad guys to get machine guns. Why does the application process take up to a year? I can't fathom a scenario that the ATF does not check the names of all parties listed on a trust, nor does any reputable dealer not check the purchasing individual. But such is life, and after mid June, all your named Trustees, and beneficiaries will likely need to have the new form (fingerprints and photo) to send off.

Take Away:  

As of right now, nothing changes. As of June, we are in a new regime. It will be a little easier if you purchase an NFA item as an individual, and a little more paperwork if you use a trust after that point. Again, the only way for multiple individuals to possess a "shared" item individually is to use the trust or other entity, so if that is your goal, the trust will still be the recommended path. Happy (quiet) shooting.



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